Announcing the new FCDO grant for ETC of PWD

We are very pleased to announce that the VPlus@GDPU programme, run by the UK based charity ETC of PWD, will now be co-funded by the Foreign and Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO)for the next two years.

This project has been awarded the grant from UK Aid Direct under the FCDO’s Small Charities Challenge Fund (SCCF). Their fund supports civil society organisations to achieve sustained poverty reduction. VPlus@GPDU is now a project funded by UK aid from the British people as well as all the generous donors to ETC of PWD.  

New hairdressing trainees on the Vplus programme

What is VPlus?

The VPlus programme is now goes by the longer name:  Enhancing the Capacity of Young Persons with Disability through Vocational and Literacy Education and Training. We will stick with Vplus; it’s shorter! Vplus will give youth with disabilities in Gulu, Northern Uganda and surrounding districts, suitable market relevant skills. It will of course, still be delivered by our long term partners: Gulu Disabled Persons Union.

Faruk Musema, GDPU Guidance Counsellor explaining the African context for people with disability

The V stands for vocational training Plus, because that’s what the programme delivers, even more so with the new grant. Through key skills training – literacy, numeracy, financial literacy and so on – through psycho-social support which helps trainees develop the self-esteem we all need to get anywhere in life. Through employment and meaningful economic activity, VPlus trainees can gain the dignity and self-respect everyone deserves and truly become self-supporting and respected members of their community.

New student orientation on the Vplus programme

What difference will this grant make?

In a word, significant.

The grant amount, (£28,818) will match what ETC of PWD is putting in (£22,174, plus the money we have already contributed to setting up the programme. Much of the recent ETC of PWD funding by the way, came from contributions by individual donors. Now is the time to thank them again for their contributions, without their extra funds we would not have got this far. Many thanks again.

How long will the programme run?

With this grant, the VPlus programme will now run for two years. One year was all ETC could pay for and one year is never really enough to establish a sustainable training programme. There will be two cohorts of 50 trainees rather than one. Two times six months of vocational training, two times six months of Post-Training support. These extra funds mean for example that we can now afford some high-quality machines for training in Sweater Weaving and laptops for the new Computer course; machines that will last.

Sports are a vital part of the Vplus training programme

Covid 19

But, most significant in the current context is the refurbishment of the GDPU site to make it Covid 19 secure. Issues like the perimeter fence, the gatehouse for the watchman, paying for a matron/ nurse can all be solved properly now. Longer term funding brings the security and opportunities for future sustainability that underfunded organisations like GDPU need. This grant will help keep vulnerable staff and students safe and give them a real future to look forward to for the first time in their lives.

How are things pushing on at GDPU? The Vplus programme, a New Year 2021 update Part Two: How did we get here?

How do you know when something has worked and what do you do with the ‘something’ subsequently?

The essence of the ETC of PWD approach has always been that the people we we work with already know what they need to make their lives and the life of their community strong and sustainable. Our role is to support the skills training to fill the needs they identify. We have seen far too much generic training, imposed by others, that misses its targets, so we work with people with a track record in getting it right, who are from the very community that needs the support. These people are of course: Gulu Disabled Persons Union (GDPU).

GDPU Offices 2020

How does this work in practice?

Here are some examples of how we all worked on the new courses for trainees on the Vplus training programme for youth with disabilities, opening at GDPU on the 20th January.

Most of the new programme was worked out during the ETC of PWD trustees visit in February 2020:

  • The courses should be market driven, the training should be as flexible as possible.
  • The numbers should low to allow as one to one contact.
  • Psycho social support and sport/ physical literacy should be heavily involved at all stages.
  • Literacy, numeracy and financial training must be more than an add on.
  • We also spent hours on the difficult issue of Post Training Support, its where many vocational training courses collapse.
Socially distanced induction training for new GDPU teachers

Market Relevance

Next week the new teaching staff will carry out Market Relevant Assessment for each of their training areas, so that each course can be structured towards each student earning their own living.

Research has already told us that, for example, there won’t be a metalwork course. Under the old VSO/YDP programme metalwork was very popular, really well run by an inspirational teacher who worked with students afterwards to set up their own welding shop. But it is so expensive to establish yourself as a metalworker and, sadly, Gulu is overrun with existing metal workers and small companies. Their welding shop has closed, the market cannot sustain any new trainees.

The old Welders Workshop

‘Danger’

However, during the subsequent ETC@GDPU programme we realised that basic welding skills are highly marketable for motorbike repairers. For instance, ‘Danger’ a young man working out of the Lubanga Lakicha workshop in nearby Koch Goma has learnt simple welding. He hires the kit at a reasonable price per hour and mends bikes, cars; anything metal. Danger makes good money supplementing his main motorbike repair income and incidentally it allows him to pursue his real interest, music; hence his name. So, inspired by this knowledge and others like him, in the new Motorcycle Repair Course, there will be a welding module.

Beyond Core Skills

‘Danger’, loading his bike with welding kit

Likewise, Sweater Weavers will learn how to use, not only sweater weaving machines, but also sewing machines, how to make simple clothes, baby clothes in particular and, crucially, how to repair and maintain their machines. Hairdressers will have a ‘Body Beautiful and Cosmetology’ module to expand their repertoire. Electronics trainees will learn how to repair more than just mobile phones. We will also be introducing the new Design and Decoration course for applied design, signboards, posters, basic computer art etc. The laptops (laptops have batteries and can ride out the constant power outages) arrived this week. The plan is to establish a working computer room so that all trainees will leave with some basic computer skills.

A member of Gulu Disabled Persons Knitting Workshop with a child’s dress made for sale

Post Training Support

The training on site lasts for six months, what happens after that is equally important. There is also a post training course of equal length with dedicated skills training, psycho social support, literacy and numeracy extensions and so on, to help each trainee set up their own business or support them working for someone else.

Psycho-Social Support

ETC@GDPU members 2020

But you can’t learn new skills if, for example, discrimination and abuse has left you with such low esteem that you don’t believe you can ever learn anything; you believe you are literally, fit for nothing. Which is why the psycho social support element of the programme (that GDPU specialise in) has been and will continue to be, so important; hence ‘Vplus’, ie vocation training plus.  As the previous ETC@GDPU programme drew to a close, it was fascinating to see that most of the participants now have the self-confidence to publicly represent their community: we hope to replicate that community engagement with these new trainees. Many of the ETC@GDPU beneficiaries will also become peer mentors on the new Vplus programme, sustainability in action!

ETC at GDPU Reflection meeting

How are things pushing on at GDPU? The Vplus programme, a New Year 2021 update. Part One

So far, very well.

Working on the new gate at GDPU

The Vplus training programme for 50 new trainees with disabilities at Gulu Disabled Persons Union (GDPU) should still open in January. It has been put back from the 15th to the 20th January to avoid the Ugandan General Election on the 14th. Travelling for persons with disability is always very difficult, around election time even more so. There has been more violence than usual during this election with a heavy loss of life, although mostly in Kampala. Covid restrictions have stopped the big and often very disruptive campaign meetings of the past. Gulu has been largely peaceful and we are told that it will probably remain so, although people are fearful of the return of the military to ‘keep order’.

How about Covid 19?

Cases are rising in Uganda, though nothing like the West. In the last two days 120 cases were reported in Kampala and 3 in Gulu. In fact, the cases in Gulu came from some way away and were brought to the hospital for treatment. The disease is certainly in the community, but without mass testing the levels of severity are unknown. Anecdotally, the virus is reported as present but not rampant, and of course everyone hopes that remains the case.

Ready to Open?

The finished new gates, fence and ramp at GDPU

Under these circumstances, GDPU staff, their Board of Governors and the trustees of ETC of PWD felt that the new Vplus programme could open this month, once certain conditions had been met. The site is now secure with a new fence and a working gate with a proper entrance ramp for wheelchairs installed! A gatekeeper appointed and trained, a hut built for him to shelter in, a temperature gun bought for him to test each entrant onto site. Toilets have been refurbished, cesspits drained, washrooms built, handbasins installed and water supplied to site.  Classrooms extended, isolation zones created, boarding facilities rearranged to make suitable social distancing spaces. All staff have been trained in Covid procedures.

Registration of new students in Anaka

Recruitment

52 trainees have been recruited, their families and communities consulted and reassured. New teaching staff for the five courses on offer have been interviewed, appointed and received full induction.

Inception Meeting

Socially distanced Induction training for new GDPU teachers

The key action for all this to work is the Inception Meeting and Inspection by the District Education Officer. He will inspect the site, assess the preparations and check that staff know what they are doing. This was to have been on Friday 8th, but not all Government and District offices have fully re-opened after the Christmas break, it will be re-arranged for next week.

So, fingers crossed all involved in the Vplus programme can look forward to the future, and not only the 52 new trainees themselves and subsequently their families and community that they will, we hope, support. But also, for  the new teaching staff who now have work and an income in challenging times. And, of course, for the staff and Board of Gulu Disabled Persons Union who have, at last some stability and activity on site. As Ojok Patrick the GDPU coordinator said in a recent email: “We are so happy that after many years of no activities, we are back on our feet again and the place is getting busier.”

Working on the toilets

Exciting Times!

For more news and details about what courses will be run, try the next blog here.

Announcing Vplus@GDPU

The old toilet block at GDPU: blocked

As the old ETC@GDPU project draws to a close we have good news to announce: the first steps on our new vocational training programme at Gulu Disabled Persons Union have been taken. It will be called Vplus@GDPU, – V is for Vocational Training and ‘plus’ showing the extra elements that make training successful.

Old classrooms, waiting for a new programme

Vplus@GDPU: The New Programme

50 disabled young people will be trained at GDPU on a six months training programme, followed by six months post training support. ETC of PWD (Enhancing the Capacity of People with Disability, our UK based charity that has worked with GDPU for some time) is funding the start of the programme, and we are searching hard for other funding to expand it. There is a possibility of a major grant, but in the international development world nothing is certain so we are keen to find new ways to make this exciting programme work.

Old classrooms waiting to be refurbished

Covid 19 in Uganda and Gulu

Of course, nothing is certain in any part of the world at the moment. Africa, apart from South Africa, has been hit relatively lightly by the Coronavirus. To date there have been 14,403 cases in Uganda, 132 deaths across the whole country and 10 in Gulu with seven possible new contacts in in the district notified today. The Lockdown in March affected everyone, but was hardest on those who have the least.

Covid 19 security at GDPU

Working on the toilet block at GDPU

For the new training programme to go ahead in Gulu, the GDPU site has to be made Covid 19 secure. That means proper access to sanitation: new handwashing sinks and toilet blocks for example. Every person allowed on site must be Covid 19 free, so access must be controlled by repairing the old fence, making a proper gateway, installing a new gatekeeper, buying temperature guns for the gatekeeper to use on each entrant. We are keeping the numbers of new trainees down, partly to make sure that every trainee gets proper attention but also to keep to social distancing rules. That will demand new classrooms, extending and refurbishing existing ones and making specialist isolation zones. And lots more and lots of extra training for everyone. A busy time!

Working on the toilet block at GDPU
Working on the toilet block

Vplus@ GDPU from now until January 2021

All being well, the actual training will start in the second week of January 2021. Recruitment, including discussions with parents and communities should start shortly. There are many ifs and buts that might stall the process, but everyone working on the programme in Gulu is feeling positive, and we join them in looking forward to an exciting new start.

The gates at GDPU

Vplus @GDPU: what next and how did we get here?

There is much more to come: how we all arrived at choosing the new training courses for instance; what was learned from the old ETC@GDPU programme? What has happened to people on that programme and what role will they play in the new one? How have the sportsmen at Gulu PWDs electronics been getting on? Will sport play any role in Vplus (spoiler alert: yes). But for now, in these challenging times it is just wonderful to be able to spread some good news.

Wheelchair basketball at GDPU

Donations?

Just to remind you, our donations page is always open; every little helps.